How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

When you introduce a new dog to your current dog, it's important to DO THE FOLLOWING:

The 'Planning Stage':

What to do before bringing your new dog home...

  • Food. Where will the new dog eat? Feed them in different rooms and make sure they have their own feeding area and treats and access to water in  various places in the house.
  • Bed. Settling into a brand-new environment can be very stressful for a dog. Every dog needs a safe place to call their own and catch those all important 'z's - you can check out our really helpful blog post on the benefits of a calming dog bed and how to choose the right bed to suit your new dog.
  • Toys. Not all dogs need and / or love toys but work on the basis that they do and they will be prized possessions which can easily lead to a squabble or two! Keep their toys separate. Kong offer a great, cost effective monthly subscription for toys and treats and they come in a cool box so you can store their precious stuff separately. Check out our review here.
  • Time alone. Both dogs will time alone with you to feel secure and get used to their new home set up. It is important to establish a bond with your new addition but to also show affection to your existing dog to make them feel secure. If you are introducing a new puppy then early training is key but it also important to maintain the routine for your existing dog.
  • Plan your journey home with your new dog. Take a family member or friend with you if you can so that you have an extra pair of hands. If you are travelling in a car you need to consider how you will keep them safe and possible apart. Dog carrier seats or seat belt attachments are a good idea. 
  • Take them both for a walk in neutral territory before venturing inside. See further tips below!
  • Make sure the house is in order as above in respect of their food, water and sleeping arrangements. You can also keep them both on a lead whilst they get their bearings and start getting used to being in each other's space and you can then gently take the lead if you need to distance them from each other. Give your new dog a tour of the home!
  • Watch for signs of stress and try to minimise it. Keep life calm. This is not always easy if you also have a family, including kids! try to minimise the number of visitors to your home for the first few weeks in order that you can work on an establish the new routine in your household.

The 'Homing' Stage:

  • Keep the dogs separate for a few days.
  • Try letting them see each other from a distance in neutral territory.
  • Take things slowly and give them plenty of time to adjust to each other and get used to each other's scent.
  • Increase the amount of time they spend together.
  • Reward positive interactions.
  • Keep an eye on their body language and give them plenty of time to adjust to each other's presence.

With a little patience, you'll soon have two happy, well-adjusted dogs!

As you are planning on adding a new furry friend to your family, you will need to make sure that the introduction process goes as smoothly as possible so let's dig in (no dog pun intended!) to these tips a little deeper!

Neutral meeting place

If you're uncertain about a dog's response to your new addition, be prudent. Ideally, plan to get the dogs together for their initial interaction in a neutral place. Pick an environment in which none of the dogs are territorial.

This will help to reduce the chances of territorial aggression.

Once you're in the chosen location, let your current dog sniff the new dog before they have a chance to interact. This will help them to get familiar with each other's scent.

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

Take things slowly, letting the dogs interact only when they seem comfortable and relaxed. 

Slowly increase the amount of time they spend together, gradually building up to longer periods.

Be sure to provide plenty of opportunities for positive reinforcement, such as treats and praise, when they interact calmly with each other.

If either of your dogs shows signs of discomfort or aggression, separate them and try again later. With patience and positive reinforcement, you can help your dogs develop a strong bond with each other.

How do you prepare for introducing a New Dog to your home?

How you introduce a new dog to your home will have a big impact on how they get along long term.

You want to make sure that both dogs feel comfortable and safe during the process. The best way to start is by keeping them separate for the first few days and gradually allow for initial and increased periods of contact.

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

This will give the new dog time to adjust to their new environment without feeling overwhelmed.

During this time, you should also be working on establishing rules and boundaries for both dogs.

Once the new dog has had a chance to settle in, you can start introducing them to your current dog. Begin with short, supervised sessions where they can sniff and explore each other from a distance.

Starting with a neutral space as addressed above.

This can then be widened to contact in a garden or outdoor area at home or nearby. If everything goes well, you can gradually increase the amount of time they spend together until they are comfortable being around each other. With a little patience and planning, you can successfully introduce a new dog into your home.

How you introduce a new dog to your current dog also depends on the personalities of both dogs.

If your current dog is laid back and doesn't get too excited when meeting new people or dogs, then you can introduce the new dog slowly by letting them sniff each other through a wire mesh fence or baby gate.

If your current dog is more excitable, then it's best to introduce the new dog on neutral territory, such as a park, so that neither dog feels territorial.

Once the dogs have met and seem to be getting along, you can let them interact more freely.

It's very important to keep an eye on them during their first few encounters and to separate them if there is any fighting or aggression. With patience and careful introductions, most dogs will learn to get along well with each other.

How long does it take for a dog to adjust to a new dog?

It varies from dog to dog, but usually it takes a few days to a few weeks for a dog to warm up to a new canine companion.

Some dogs adjust immediately and become fast friends, while others may take a little longer to get used to the change in their routine.

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

During this time, they may seem standoffish or even aggressive towards the new dog. However, this is usually just a case of them trying to establish their place in the pack.

How quickly they adjust will depend on a number of factors, including the dogs' personalities, the amount of time they have to get used to each other, and how well they are supervised during their initial interactions.

In general, it is best to introduce the dogs slowly and give them plenty of time to sniff and explore each other before allowing them to play or interact too closely.

With patience and consistent training, most dogs will eventually learn to get along with their new furry friend. In some cases, it may even take a month or two for them to truly become best buds.

So if you're thinking about adding a new furry member to your family, be prepared to be patient while your dogs adjust to each other.

The best way to help your dog adjust to a new arrival is to provide plenty of patience, positive reinforcement and plenty of love.

Dogs are social creatures, and with time and patience, most will come to accept their new furry friend.

However, if you have any concerns about your dog's behavior, it is always best to consult with a veterinarian or certified animal behaviorist.

How do I get my dog to accept a new puppy?

Meeting a new dog can be a scary experience for some pups.

In order to make sure that the introduction goes smoothly, it is important to take things slowly and give each dog plenty of time to sniff and explore.

Start by letting the dogs sniff each other through a fence or screen door, and if they seem interested, move on to letting them meet face-to-face on neutral ground.

Once they have had a chance to get to know each other, you can introduce them in your home or yard.

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

Remember to supervise closely at first, and keep the interactions short and positive. Start with a brief meeting, allowing the dogs to sniff each other and get used to each other's presence. If everything goes well, you can gradually increase the length and frequency of the meetings. With patience and slow introductions, two dogs can learn to coexist peacefully and form a lifelong friendship.

How do you introduce 2 dogs when one is aggressive?

Dogs are social creatures that enjoy the company of other dogs, but sometimes they can be territorial or even aggressive.

If you have two dogs and one is aggressive, it's important to introduce them slowly and carefully to avoid any fighting or injuries.

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

The best way to do this is to start by walking them on a leash in different areas of the house so they can get used to each other's scent. Once they seem comfortable, you can try letting them off the leash in a neutral area like a park.

Give each dog plenty of space to sniff and explore. Allow them to approach each other at their own pace, and don't force them to interact if they seem uncomfortable.

When introducing two dogs, it is important to take each dog's personality into account. An aggressive dog may feel threatened by another dog, even if the other dog is not being aggressive.

As a result, it is important to introduce the dogs slowly and carefully. Start by having them smell each other from a distance. If both dogs seem calm, you can then allow them to approach each other and sniff each other more closely.

If one or both dogs become agitated, however, it is best to back off and give them more time to get used to each other's presence. With patience and gradual introduction, most dogs will eventually be able to get along with each other.

It's always important to supervise closely and be ready to intervene if necessary.

If the introduction goes well, as above, you can gradually start giving them more freedom to interact with each other.

With patience and time, most dogs can learn to get along with each other, even if they don't become best friends.

How do you introduce two dogs when one is territorial?

Introducing two dogs can be a challenging task in any scenario but especially if one of the dogs is territorial.

When introducing two dogs in this situation, it is important to do so in a way that minimizes stress and anxiety. If one of the dogs is territorial, it is best to introduce them on neutral ground, such as a park or in a room that neither dog has claimed as their own. It is also important to let the dogs approach each other at their own pace, without forcing them to interact.

Again, the key is to go slowly and give the dogs plenty of time to get to know each other.

In addition to the tips above, you could start by walking them on opposite sides of the street or in different areas of the park.

If they seem interested in each other, let them approach each other and sniff noses. Once they've had a chance to get acquainted, you can try walking them together on a leash.

Once they have had a chance to sniff each other out, you can give them each a treat to help create a positive association. 

If one of the dogs starts to show signs of aggression, such as growling or lunging, put some distance between them and try again another day.

With patience, positive reinforcement and again time, most dogs can learn to happily share their space with another four-legged friend.

How do you get an older dog to accept a new dog?

One common challenge that pet owners face is how to get an older dog to accept a new dog.

Bringing a new dog into your home can be a enjoyable experience for both you and your current furry friend. But sometimes, it doesn't go as planned. Your old dog may not be too thrilled about the new addition to the family.

It can be tough to see your old dog become grumpy and resentful when a new furry friend comes into the picture. But with a little patience and understanding, you can help them adjust.

How do you get an older dog to accept a new dog?

There are a few things you can do to help make the transition smoother for everyone involved. First, give your older dog some time to get used to the new arrival.

First, introduce the dogs gradually. Start by letting them see and sniff each other from a distance.

Let them sniff each other out at their own pace and get comfortable with each other's scent. Once they've had a chance to get acquainted, start gradually introducing them to each other. Start with short periods of interaction, and gradually increase the length of time as they get more comfortable.

Then, let them interact while you are supervising. If everything goes well, you can then let them have supervised playtime together. 

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

Another thing you can do is to continue to show your love and attention to your older dog. Make sure he knows that he is still an important part of the family. Give him extra cuddles and treats, and continue his regular routine as much as possible. With time and patience, your two dogs will become fast friends.

It's also important to maintain a consistent routine for both dogs, including mealtimes, walks, and playtime.

It's a good idea to keep the older dog's routine as unchanged as possible during this time. This means feeding them at the same time and in the same place, and taking them for walks at the same time each day.

Lastly, make sure to provide plenty of opportunities for the two dogs to play together. This will help them build a bond and establish a relationship as packmates.

With a little patience and effort, you can help your dogs form a lasting bond.

Should I let my older dog growl at the new puppy?

When you first bring a puppy into your home, it's natural for there to be a period of adjustment as your older dog gets used to the newcomer. Some dogs will welcome the puppy with open paws, while others may be more hesitant.

It's a question many dog owners face at some point. After all, puppies are playful and full of energy, and it's only natural for them to want to roughhouse with their canine companions.

However, it's important to remember that puppies are also inexperienced and can unintentionally hurt an older dog. For this reason, it's generally best to supervise play sessions between puppies and older dogs.

If an older dog growls at a puppy, it's usually a sign that he's feeling overwhelmed or uncomfortable.

While it may seem like an aggression problem at first, in many cases it is simply the older dog's way of communicating with the puppy. Puppies can be playful and rowdy, and they often do not know their own strength.

An older dog may growl as a way of telling the puppy to back off. However, if the growling escalates into snarling or snapping, it is important to intervene. This could be a sign of true aggression, and it is best to err on the side of caution.

One way that some dogs will assert their dominance over a puppy is by growling or even snapping at them. Allowing the growling or snapping to continue could lead to a fight, so it's important to intervene if you see this happening.

If the growling is accompanied by raised hackles or a stiff body, it's likely that the older dog is simply trying to establish their place in the pack.

By supervising playtime and being mindful of your dog's body language, you can help ensure that everyone stays happy and safe.

By giving the older dog some space, you can help them to feel more comfortable around the puppy and avoid any potential problems down the road.

However, if the growling escalates into aggression and if you are unsure how to handle the situation, consult with a professional trainer, veterinarian or professional trainer or behaviorist.

Do dogs get jealous when you bring another dog home?

It's common for people to feel a little jealous when a new person enters their life, even if that person is just a four-legged friend.

But what about dogs?

Do they get jealous when you bring another dog home?

While there isn't a definitive answer, there is some evidence to suggest that dogs may indeed experience jealousy.

For example, one study found that dogs were more likely to snap at their owners or push them away when they were being petted by another dog.

Other studies have shown that dogs may become more attentive and protective of their owners when they feel threatened by a rival.

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

So, while we can't say for sure whether dogs experience jealousy in the same way that humans do, it's clear that they are capable of complex emotions.

This is a common question people ask when they're considering getting a second dog. After all, no one wants their furry friend to feel left out or replaced.

The good news is that most dogs do not experience envy in the same way that humans do. Instead, they tend to view other dogs as either companions or rivals. If your dog already has a strong bond with you, they are more likely to see a new dog as a friend and welcome them into the pack.

However, if your dog is prone to jealousy or doesn't have much experience socializing with other dogs, they may be more likely to see a new arrival as a threat.

While it's true that dogs are social animals and enjoy companionship, they don't always want to share their owner's attention.

In some cases, jealousy may result in behavioral problems such as whining, barking, or aggression. However, it's important to remember that every dog is different, and some may not show any signs of jealousy at all.

If you're concerned that your dog may be feeling jealous, the best thing to do is to talk to your veterinarian or a qualified animal behaviorist. They'll be able to assess your dog's behavior and provide advice on how to best deal with the situation.

Also - check out this great guide...

People Also Ask....

What is the best way to introduce a new dog to your home?

" The first day - Bring your dog straight home and do not stop for errands along the way. Calmly introduce to your pup to your family members outside, one at a time. Limit visitors to prevent your dog from getting overwhelmed. Keep your pup leashed, and lead them into the house for a tour of each room." - Animal Rescue League of Boston

How do you introduce a new dog into your home with a dog?

"Introduce on neutral territory.

If the dogs are not showing any negative behaviors, reward them with treats just for seeing each other. For example, when the dog you're walking looks at the other dog, you can say “Good boy!” in a happy, friendly voice and give him a treat. Repeat often." - The Humane Society of the United States

How long does it take for dogs to accept a new dog?

"It can take up to one month for an old dog and new dog to really settle in and accept each other's position in the pack. If you want a second dog, you need to be ready to commit to this process and not panic. Below is info to help you decide whether this step is for you and if so, how to make it successful." - Homeward Trails Animal Rescue

Will my dog be sad if I get another dog?

"Dogs are inherently social animals that live well together in groups, but that does not mean that all dogs get along. Most dogs will welcome a new sibling, but it is not always smooth sailing. The furry family member you have now will face many changes when a new dog enters the picture and may feel a bit displaced." - VCA Animal Hospitals

How do you get two dogs to like each other?

"Here are some actionable steps dog owners can take to help two pooches get along.

  1. Choose a neutral location to meet....
  2. Introduce the dogs in stages....
  3. Prevent resource guarding....
  4. Be equally attentive....
  5. Spay or neuter your dogs....
  6. Practice obedience training....
  7. Work with a professional animal behaviorist." - Masterclass.com

Is it better to have 1 or 2 dogs?

"Having two dogs can feel like a lot of work sometimes, but the pros definitely outweigh the cons. From easier training to better mental and emotional health (for you and your dogs!), to saving the lives of animals, there are so many solid reasons to adopt a second dog today." - The Spruce Pets

What is the best age to add a second dog?

"Many breeders recommend that your first dog be at least one-to-two-years old before you add a second to the family. If you have an old dog, he may not be physically able to play with or tolerate a pup." - AKC Advice


How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Current Dog | Four Paw Pals

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